Surface Temperature Blog 11-30-09

November 30, 2009 by  
Filed under Surface Temperature Field Campaign

Hi All,
Today is the first day of the 2009 GLOBE Surface Temperature field Campaign. This year’s field campaign will run from November 30 to December 18, 2009. We had great participation last year. Students from over 60 schools participated in surface temperature observations worldwide last year with most of the schools located in Michigan, Ohio, Iowa, Pennsylvania, Alaska and California. Observations were also taken in places such as Finland, Estonia, Poland, Trinidad and Tobago, Thailand and the Dominican Republic. Don’t forget that your observations need to be entered into the GLOBE website using Universal Time. If you have questions about UTC, go to http://www.globe.gov/arc/faq/view.cgi?convert-ut&lang=en&nav=6
<p>If you have any questions, contact: Kevin Czajkowski, 419-530-4274, kczajko@utnet.utoledo.edu
<p>I was able to get outside today and took surface temperature of the grassy field in front of the University of Toledo and a paved area behind the building I work in. The average temperature for the grassy field was 6.4 C and for the paved area was 8.5 C. There wasn’t a big difference because there was a lot of clouds today. I didn’t have time to enter the data on the GLOBE website. I hope to tomorrow.

I have been in contact with teachers all over the world this year and am looking forward to a successful campaign. A number of schools have already entered data. A shout out (that’s what people do these days, right?) to Mr. Frantz and Mrs. Whaley at Roswell-Kent Middle School in Akron, OH, Mrs. Burns at Main Street School in Norwalk, OH, Mr. Versele from Bellefontaine High School, Mrs. McGuire from Lakewood Catholic Academy in Lakewood, OH, Mr. Glink from Indian Lake High School in North Lewiston, OH and the teachers and students at Kilingi-Nomme Gymnasium in Parnumaa, Estonia. Thank you to your students for starting to take and enter data on the GLOBE website. It looks like everyone entered their data in Celsius and used Universal Time correctly. Great work.

As I have done in the past, I will talk a lot about snow on this blog. I really like snow. I came to love it as a young student when I was 10 years old. I grew up in Buffalo, NY which is at the eastern end of Lake Erie in the Great Lakes. It snows there a lot. In 1977 there was a blizzard and school was closed for a week. I thought that was great. I started to follow the weather after that and have hoped for snow ever since. Well, this November has been pretty warm in Toledo, OH. The temperature was nearly 3 degrees Celsius above the 30 year average. There hasn’t been any measurable snow. The most likely reason that it has been warmer than normal with no snow is that there is an El Nino in the Pacific Ocean. I will write a blog about El Nino over the next couple weeks. El Nino causes the cold air to stay in Canada. Even though there is an El Nino this year, it looks like temperatures will get colder in the United States over the next few days and, in general, stay cool for the next week. Cold air is going to come out of Canada. This means that some of the schools participating in the field campaign will get some snow and be able to see how snow affects the surface temperature.

That is all for now. Leave a comment letting everyone know how you are doing.

Great Classroom Activities and Resources!

November 22, 2009 by  
Filed under NASA

378422main_Space_Math_IVThings of Interest

The Educational Materials section of NASA’s Web site offers classroom activities, educator guides, posters and other types of resources that are available for use in the classroom. Materials are listed by type, grade level and subject. The following items are now available for downloading.

I am helping my wife use the Space Math materials. She just started a long-term substitute teaching job in math.

Space Math IV — Grades 9-12
This collection of activities is based on a weekly series of problems distributed to teachers during 2007-2008 school year. The problems in this booklet investigate space phenomena and math applications such as black holes, sunspots, the moon’s atmosphere, scientific notation, evaluating functions, Benford’s law and geometry. The problems are authentic glimpses of modern science and engineering issues, often involving actual research data. Each word problem includes background information. The one-page assignments are accompanied by one-page teachers answer keys.
http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/topnav/materials/listbytype/Space_Math_IV.html

Aeronautics Research Poster — All Grades
The first A in NASA stands for Aeronautics. The X-48B blended wing body test vehicle on the front of the poster is an example of NASA’s cutting-edge research. Besides aeronautics education and scholarship information, the back of the poster details the programs, work, research and careers of NASA’s Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate.
http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/topnav/materials/listbytype/Aeronautics_Research_Poster.html

Aerospace Design Poster — All Grades
The first A in NASA stands for Aeronautics. The Aerospace Design poster reflects images from the “Aerospace Design: The Art of Engineering from NASA’s Aeronautical Research” exhibit to commemorate 100 years of powered flight. Artifacts on the poster include architectural and engineering designs for wind tunnels, wind tunnel models, and designs for conceptual airplanes, past and present.
http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/topnav/materials/listbytype/Aerospace_Design_Poster.html

INSPIRE Brochure — Grades 9-12
Students in grades 9-12 can apply to be participants in the Interdisciplinary National Science Project Incorporating Research and Education Experience. INSPIRE is a one-year program for students interested in science, technology, engineering and mathematics. The Online Learning Community, the centerpiece of the program, allows INSPIRE students to interact with their peers, NASA experts and education specialists.
http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/topnav/materials/listbytype/INSPIRE_Brochure.html

Decades of Contributions to Tilt Rotor Aviation Lithograph — All Grades
The first A in NASA stands for Aeronautics. Over NASA’s 50-year history, and even before as the National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics, or NACA, the agency has helped to improve aircraft. The front of the Decades of Contributions lithograph shows an artist’s concept of a tilt rotor aircraft with labels pointing to NASA contributions. The back of the lithograph lists and explains how research has improved the safety, efficiency and performance of tilt rotor aircraft.
http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/topnav/materials/listbytype/Rotorcraft_Aviation_Litho.html

Decades of Contributions to Commercial Aviation Lithograph — All Grades
The first A in NASA stands for Aeronautics. Over NASA’s 50-year history, and even before as the National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics, or NACA, the agency has helped to improve commercial air travel. The front of the Decades of Contributions lithograph shows an artist’s concept of a commercial aircraft with labels pointing to NASA contributions. The back of the lithograph lists and explains how research has improved the safety, efficiency and performance of commercial jetliners.
http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/topnav/materials/listbytype/Commercial_Aviation_Litho.html

Decades of Contributions to General Aviation Lithograph — All Grades
The first A in NASA stands for Aeronautics. Over NASA’s 50-year history, and even before as the National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics, or NACA, the agency has helped to improve commercial air travel. The front of the Decades of Contributions lithograph shows an artist’s concept of a general aviation aircraft with labels pointing to NASA contributions. The back of the lithograph lists and explains how research has improved the safety, efficiency and performance of general aviation aircraft.
http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/topnav/materials/listbytype/General_Aviation_Litho.html

Decades of Contributions to Rotorcraft Aviation Lithograph — All Grades
The first A in NASA stands for Aeronautics. Over NASA’s 50-year history, and even before as the National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics, or NACA, the agency has helped to improve rotorcraft. The front of the Decades of Contributions lithograph shows an artist’s concept of a helicopter with labels pointing to NASA contributions. The back of the lithograph lists and explains how research has improved the safety, efficiency and performance of rotorcraft.
http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/topnav/materials/listbytype/Rotorcraft_Aviation_Litho.html

Decades of Contributions to Military Aviation Lithograph — All Grades
The first A in NASA stands for Aeronautics. Over NASA’s 50-year history, and even before as the National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics, or NACA, the agency has helped to improve military aircraft. The front of the Decades of Contributions lithograph shows an artist’s concept of a military aircraft with labels pointing to NASA contributions. The back of the lithograph lists and explains how research has improved the safety, efficiency and performance of military airplanes.
http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/topnav/materials/listbytype/Military_Aviation_Litho.html

Neutral Buoyancy: Astronaut Training Is Not Always “Sink or Swim” — Grades 9-12
Watch the short NASA Brain Bites video “Why Do Astronauts Practice Underwater?” and use the accompanying resource sheet to explain sinking and floating. NASA astronauts simulate floating in space as they train for spacewalks in a huge pool called the Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory. The video shows the NBL, and the resource sheet lists questions, answers and resources to stimulate a discussion on density and Archimedes’ Principle. The resource sheet includes links to more buoyancy activities.
http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/topnav/materials/listbytype/Neutral_Bouyancy.html

What Is the Temperature of Space? — Grades 9-12

Watch a short NASA Brain Bites video and use the accompanying resource sheet to explain why objects traveling through space have a temperature but space does not. The resource sheet contains questions and answers to stimulate a discussion about the types of heat transfer, solar absorptivity, IR emissivity, and how NASA designs spacecraft and spacesuits for astronauts.
http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/topnav/materials/listbytype/What_Is_the_Temperature.html

Spacesuits: Pressurized Protection from Thermal Effects — Grades 9-12
Start with the NASA Brain Bites video “How Do You Scratch Your Nose in a Spacesuit?” for basic information about the suits. Then build on the video with a discussion of how the suit is like a “personal spacecraft.” This resource sheet lists discussion questions, answers, and resources about spacesuits and air pressure. In an application of Ohm’s Law, students calculate the current drawn by the heaters in a spacesuit glove. The resource sheet includes additional links and resources about spacesuits and albedo.
http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/topnav/materials/listbytype/Spacesuits_Pressurized_Protection.html

Ares I Can Model — All Grades
NASA plans to send humans back to the moon and on to Mars. To do this, the agency is developing a new rocket called the Ares I. Teachers and students can build an Ares I model. This easy-to- build model, made of cans of foods, was originally created to give visually impaired students an idea of the structure and relative sizes of the parts of Ares I.
http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/topnav/materials/listbytype/Ares_I_Can_Model.html

“Out of Sight” Remote Vehicle Activity — Grades 5-9
Engineers and scientists tested the FIDO rover in the Mojave Desert. The rover drivers worked out of a trailer without watching the rovers. In similar fashion, in this activity students drive a remote-controlled car through a course to learn the challenges faced while trying to operate a planetary rover. They will use measurement, geometry and problem-solving skills to move through the course.
http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/topnav/materials/listbytype/Out_of_Sight_Activity.html

Rover Races Activity — Grades 5-9
Students learn the challenges of operating a robot on Mars from Earth. In this simulation, the rover drivers upload their commands to their rovers (team of three blindfolded students) to travel around obstacles on the Martian surface (red paper on the floor) and complete the mission.
http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/topnav/materials/listbytype/Rover_Races_Activity.html

Buzz Lightyear ‘Putting It All Together’ Activity — Grades 3-8
Buzz Lightyear has the distinguished honor of having been the longest-serving toy in space. He launched May 31, 2008, aboard the space shuttle Discovery with mission STS-124. He returned on Discovery 15 months later on Sept. 11, 2009, with STS-128. Now, back on Earth, Buzz has a challenge for your students: Create a Rube Goldberg-type device that incorporates at least 10 steps to put a marble in a cup. Students use their knowledge of the design process and physical science to design, test, modify and build a successful device.
http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/topnav/materials/listbytype/Buzz_Lightyear_Putting_It_All_Together.html

Waste Limitation Management and Recycling Design Challenge Educator Guide – Grades 5-8 & Informal
This guide is a starting point for middle school students to research and answer the challenging questions of how to maintain human habitations on the moon and other planets in the solar system. The guide focuses specifically on the need for water recycling. The guide includes background information on topics relating to the moon, Earth’s water cycle and water recycling. Several basic classroom activities on water recycling are also included.
http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/topnav/materials/listbytype/WLMR_Guide.html

Celebrating Apollo U.S. History and Human Geography Series — Grades 9-12
The Celebrating Apollo series provides challenging supplemental problems for students enrolled in advanced U.S. history and advanced human geography courses. NASA’s Apollo Program had a great effect on the history, politics, and social and economic indicators of the United States. Students are exposed to this rich history as they interpret its meaning and connection with other events in that era. Each problem set includes a teacher edition with scoring guide and a student edition.
http://www.nasa.gov/audience/foreducators/topnav/materials/listbytype/Celebrating_Apollo_Series.html

INTERNATIONAL YEAR OF ASTRONOMY
This year celebrates the 400th anniversary of Galileo’s first observations of the Cosmos through a telescope. The following website has articles, posters and lessons to help celebrate the IYA.
http://cosmictimes.gsfc.nasa.gov/

Field Campaign Teleconference

November 21, 2009 by  
Filed under Related Topics

Tuesday December 1, 2009 4:00 to 5:00 Eastern Standard Time
We realize some of you may have questions about the data collection for the surface temperature field campaign.  Therefore, we are having a teleconference to answer any of your questions on Tuesday December 1, 2009 from 4:00 to 5:00 pm Eastern Standard Time (2000 to 2100 Universal Time).  Let’s have it just after the field campaign starts because you may have questions generated as you start.
To call in, dial (877) 712-6701 (toll free number). The Conference code: 419-530-4313.
Directions: Dial the number when prompted enter the conference code, followed by a #.

GLOBE Surface Temperature Field Campaign

November 21, 2009 by  
Filed under Related Topics

November 30 to December 18, 2009
Our seventh annual GLOBE surface temperature field campaign will be held from November 30 to December 18, 2009. We had great participation last year. Students from over 60 schools participated in surface temperature observations worldwide last year with most of the schools located in Michigan, Ohio, Iowa, Pennsylvania, Alaska and California. Observations were also taken in places such as Finland, Estonia, Poland, Trinidad and Tobago, Thailand and the Dominican Republic. Don’t forget that your observations need to be entered into the GLOBE website using Universal Time. If you have questions about UTC, go to http://www.globe.gov/arc/faq/view.cgi?convert-ut&lang=en&nav=6

November SATELLITES Newsletter

November 16, 2009 by  
Filed under Dr. C's Blog

Students at the SATELLITES Conference

Students at the SATELLITES Conference

We have many exciting things going on at SATALLITES as you can tell! Make sure to checkout the following:

Again this school year, we are planning a SATELLITES K-12 Conference for April 2010 in the Toledo area. But, for those of you who are not able to make the face-to-face conference, we will have a SATELLITES K-12 Virtual Conference where students can submit their projects as videos to a website like TeacherTube.com.

K-12 students participated in a virtual, science conference for OhioView’s SATELLITES remote sensing conference. Students, whose teachers have participated in SATELLITES, took observations and developed inquiry-based research projects to explore their local landscapes in order to understand the way in which the polar regions affect the Earth. The theme for the SATELLITES projects was the International Polar Year.

Announcing, Winners of the face-to-face SATELLITES Project Competition 2009 in Ohio

Grades K-6

1st place – Saeda Shalhout O.W. Holmes School Sticky Sand-Who’s Got the Most? Teacher – C. Atkinson

Grades 7-9
1st place – Sam Thomas Hunter Riccio Matthew Pellioni St. Joseph School Green…Or Not..The Choice is Ours Teacher – P. Mallory
2nd place – Meghan Oberle Derek Kastner Nick Wagner St. Joseph School If You Build It Heat will Come! Teacher – J. Korhumel
3rd place – Katelyn Peth Claire Speck Anthony Wayne High School Heat Retention Among Different Species of Wood Teacher – J. Cook
Grades 10-12
1st place – Husiena Shalhout, O.W. Holmes School, Detroit, MI, The Benthic Zone: What You Don’t Know Might Kill You! Teacher – C. Atkinson
2nd place – Courtney Miller Leondra Bragg Dan Wurzinger Bowsher High School A comparison of the surface temperature of a permeable parking lot with a regular concrete parking lot. Teacher – J. Craig R. Ralha
3rd place – Kali Appenfelder Latisha Jones Brandy Taylor Polly Fox Academy Clouds vs Temperature Teacher – P. Welch

University
1st place – Jingjing Wang Bowling Green State University LANDSAT TM monitoring of sewage sludge chicken manure and cow manure applied to agricultural fields in NW Ohio Teacher – Robert Vincent
2nd place – Paul Boehnlein University of Akron Mowed Grass Identification and Filtering Using LIDAR Derived Canopy Data Teacher – Linda Barrett
3rd place – Sumantra Chatterjee Wright State University Can We Use MODIS Images to Estimate Evapotranspiration Teacher – Doyle Watts

People’s Choice Awards
Sabrina Shalhout O.W. Holmes School Can Water Get a Fever? Teacher – C. Atkinson
Xavier Grace Penta Career Center Analyzing Northwest Ohio for Intermodal Opportunities Teacher – D. Wyandt
Hunter White Jon Shinew Cayla Lutz Bowling Green Christian Academy Does Being Near a Building Affect Surface Temperature Teacher – C. Young

Announcing, Winners of the Virtual SATELLITES Project Competition 2009 in Ohio

Students prepared research projects and then video taped them and posted their videos on http://teachertube.com in April 2009.
Grades K-6

  • 1st place – Nadia Coleman, McTigue Middle School, Toledo, OH, Which Wing of McTigue is the coldest?, Teacher-Penny Choma
  • 2nd place – Brandon Stralka and Summer Motton, South Suburban Montessori, Brecksville, OH, What is the Relationship between Elevation and Snow Cover?, Teacher-Kim White
  • 3rd place – Jake Keating and Mike Rotter, Highlands Elementary School, Naperville, IL, Water is falling; temperatures are rising and drowning, Teacher-Susan Kouri

Grades 7-9

  • 1st place – Samantha Gordon, Alain Vue and Bryan Webman, Roswell Kent Middle School, Akron, OH, Surface and air temperature according to albedo, Teacher-Steve Frantz
  • 2nd place – Austin Johnson, Michael Mowery, Boy’s Village School, Smithville, OH, Climate_Change and Walruses, Teacher – Debbie Beechy
  • 3rd place – Bellefontaine High School, Temperature related by elevation, Teacher – Dennis Versele.

Grades 10-12

  • 1st place – Kyle Francis, Alex Lachat, and Abbey Monnin, Russia High School, Russia, OH, The effects between air temperature and the formation and persistence of contrails, Teacher – Eric Sullenberger
  • 2nd place – Corion Jones, Alexandra Davies, Abbey Janowiecki and Sydney Parker, Central Catholi High School, Toledo, OH, DOES SNOW SERVE AS A GROUND INSULATOR?, Teacher – Ann HajIbrahim
  • 3rd place – Tiana Duncan, Derrick Holliday and Bobbi Kolson, Barberton High School, Barberton, OH, The Tundra & Taiga Versus the north and south pole, Teacher – Russ Calvert

Some of the videos are on TeacherTube (but not all). Here are links to some of them:

In 2010, we plan to combine the SATELLITES Virtual Conferences into one conference. There will be participants from Ohio, Michigan, West Virginia and Pennsylvania.